Prefabricated Megastructure in Sasol Secunda Sets a New Standard for Off-Site Construction.

Prefabricated Megastructure in Sasol Secunda Sets a New Standard for Off-Site Construction.

Prefabricated deployment, a construction process where building components are pre-built off-site in a controlled factory environment, is rapidly gaining popularity due to its many advantages over traditional on-site construction. Companies like TurnKey Modular are pioneering new fabrication methods for off-site construction and have extensive experience offering diverse prefabricated deployment solutions underpinned by technical innovation and a client-centric focus.

Recently, TurnKey Modular was tasked with designing and constructing a prefabricated solution for Sasol South Africa’s coarse ash dump project. The project required two modular structures, one of which is an 86-tonne building that is 8.5 meters wide by 20 meters long. “In terms of weight and area, it’s probably the biggest unit that we’ve done,” says Darrin Day, TurnKey Modular Operations Manager. The building holds both medium voltage and low voltage switching equipment, switching panels, DCDVs, and battery tripping units ACDB. Additionally, it has a segregated fire and explosion-resistant battery room to ensure optimal safety, as the oil and gas industry has stringent regulations which need to be adhered to. For instance, batteries in the room need to be “intrinsic safe”, which means that should there be a spark or flame, it’s all kept within an enclosure that won’t ignite any gases that may occur in the battery room. This is the third unit of its type designed by Turnkey Modular for Sasol South Africa.

What also sets TurnKey Modular apart is its commitment to safety consciousness. The company conducts meticulous route surveys and uses engineering expertise to ensure that big loads are transported safely. For instance, on the CAD project, a D9 dozer was riding behind the truck just in case it began sliding. This level of safety consciousness was also evident in the design of the buildings, which were carefully assessed after being assembled in a fully operational state inside TurnKey Modular headquarters in Germiston, Johannesburg.

The beauty of off-site construction is that the buildings on-site in Secunda look exactly how they looked on the Turnkey Modular floor. “We stood it in the shop with all that handrails, walkways, legs, everything,” adds Day. Before being loaded onto the truck, all the small components were removed and then sent separately on a truck. The substation is fully operational and tested before leaving the factory, and the only thing that needs to go in when it gets to site is the cables that go in and out.

Prefabricated deployment is the future of construction, and companies like TurnKey Modular are leading the way. They redefine what’s possible for off-site construction and ensure that every project they undertake is done with the utmost safety and precision. The CAD Project is an excellent example of their technical innovation and client-centric approach, and it’s no wonder that they’re quickly becoming the go-to company for off-site construction solutions in South Africa.

Going Off The Grid? How To Safely Set Up Your Gas System

South Africa’s power grid has been a topic of concern for many years, with load shedding and power outages being a common occurrence. This has led many homeowners and businesses to consider going off the grid and finding alternative sources of energy. One such alternative is gas, and with the help of a registered gas practitioner, it is possible to safely remove your home or business from Eskom’s grid.

Using gas as an alternative source of energy has many benefits, including cost-effectiveness and reduced carbon emissions. It is important to note, however, that gas must be handled with care and that compliance with safety regulations is crucial. This is where a registered gas practitioner comes in.

A registered gas practitioner is a professional who is trained and qualified to work with gas systems. They can provide advice on the best gas systems for your home or business, install and maintain gas systems, and ensure that your gas system is compliant with safety regulations.

When using gas as a lifeline, it is important to ensure that your gas system is compliant with safety regulations. This includes regular maintenance and servicing of the system to ensure that it is functioning properly. It is also important to have an Electronic Certificate of Compliance (CoC). The paper book CoC is being phased out and will no longer be valid from April 1st 2023, and an updated CoC is required every time there is repair, maintenance, or servicing done on gas systems.

While gas is an excellent alternative source of energy, it is not the only option out there. Other renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power, can also be used to go off the grid depending on your business or home needs. However, gas is often the primary focus due to its accessibility, established and well-regulated industry in South Africa plus its ease of use. Gas systems are often easier to implement immediately versus the high costs of solar power solutions that can take much longer to save up for.

In conclusion, going off the grid is a viable option for homeowners and businesses in South Africa who are tired of dealing with load shedding and power outages. By using a registered gas practitioner, it is possible to safely remove your home or business from Eskom’s grid and use gas as an alternative source of energy. Compliance with safety regulations is crucial, and a CoC is required. Visit the SAQCC Gas website to find a local registered gas practitioner. The South African Qualification and Certification Committee for Gas (SAQCC Gas) is an integral part of the system that ensures safe gas installation and use in South Africa. It provides training and certification for gas practitioners and oversees compliance with safety regulations.

SARACCA speaks to championing safety as one of their standards in maintaining quality Refrigeration and Air Conditioning for all.

The South African Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Contractors Association, commonly known as SARACCA champions safety as one of their pillars which are paramount in upholding their standards. The aim of members is to continually strive to improve the image, competency and standards of the industry and the Association provides a forum for this purpose.

SARACCA is an association of contractors who have individually and jointly agreed to a set of governing standards whilst operating in free competition against each other. The association acknowledges the importance of safety as it pertains to air conditioning and refrigeration as they are two features which are a necessity to many a household, office, restaurant and other spaces.

The need and pervasiveness of air conditioning as a comfort requirement and refrigeration for food preservation in the modern world means that the repercussions of bad maintenance will have dire and far-reaching circumstances. A large proportion of food produce is lost between the fields and the dinner table due to no or poor 

Refrigeration.

Barney Richardson serves as Director of SARACCA and cautioned members with the importance of adequate training when installing refrigeration and air conditioning equipment using refrigerants.

 “SARACCA urges all installers and repair practitioners working with refrigerants to be adequately trained and competent in the Safe Handling of Refrigerants and be registered with SAQCC Gas to ensure safety. Staff should always wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) as well.”

When speaking to maintenance of air conditioners he stated, “Air conditioners regardless of size or type must always be maintained in good condition and serviced regularly by a registered practitioner.” To find out more about SARACCA safety standards visit www.saracca.co.za

SARACCA at a glance – What is a Bargaining Council?

Director of SARACCA John Parry has introduced a new column called “SARACCA at a glance”. In this column, John will speak to need-to-know information for all SARACCA members and give reminders with regards to pertinent information and give further insight into the processes behind the scenes. 

As a member of SARACCA, there is a legal requirement to be a member of a Bargaining Council. This is not optional as it is a legal requirement for all employers to be compliant. The Bargaining Council is a leg of industry which oversees due diligence processes.

What is a Bargaining Council:

A Bargaining Council is a statutory body created under the Labour Relations Act (LRA) to provide for the co-regulation of stable and productive employment relations. The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration industry falls under the Metal and Engineering Industries Bargaining Council (MEIBC).

The duty of the MEIBC is to regulate employment conditions and labour relations. It also sees to the necessary administrative measures to ensure effective collective bargaining. The MEIBC also facilitates wage negotiations and drafts the main agreement. On the social side, it manages the provident fund, pension fund, sick fund and dispute negotiation fund.

MEIBC Levies and Contributions:

In our industry we belong to the Metal and Engineering Industries Bargaining Council (MEIBC) and we need to make monthly payments to the Metal Industries Benefit Funds Administrators (MIBFA) on behalf of members. These levies are updated periodically and paid on a weekly or monthly basis and mandated by the Steel and Engineering Industries Federation of Southern Africa.

The MEIBC levies and contributions are applicable to all companies falling within the registered scope of the Metal and Engineering Industries Bargaining Council (MEIBC). As of 1 April 2023, the Administration levy is payable by each scheduled employee at R2.10 per week and R9.09 per month. The employee is matched with a contribution paid by the employer.

The Dispute Resolution levy is also payable by all employees with a matching contribution paid by the employer. The Dispute Resolution levy is charged at R0.76 per week and R3.30 per month.

It is important to note that where the total amount payable to the council is less than R175 per month, employers are no longer required to make this amount up.

After taking the above into consideration, are you and your sub-contractors compliant?

Ensure that your business remains compliant by looking out for this monthly column where we talk all things SARACCA, all the time. Making sure you remain in the loop on everything you need to know to ensure compliance and ethical trading in your business.

TESD urges members to observe incoming NLMP legislation

“In my mind we are facing three main disruptors in the labour market that are going to result in the displacement of I think between one and 1.5 million people in the next few months and years.”

These were the words of Joint Chief Executive Officer of Global Business Solutions  John Botha at the Temporary Employment Services Division webinar discussing the National Labour Migration Policy.

Botha identified the major disruptors with a particular focus on the intricacies surrounding the pertinent National Labour Migration Policy(NLMP).

The disruptors outlined by Botha were the following:

  1. The National Labour Migration Policy
  2. Employment Equity ministerial targets and
  3. Platform workers

The above mentioned were categorised as a “wonderful opportunity” for employers to build their business in alignment with South African labour law.

In the South African political landscape, foreign nationals are an easy target. Operation Dudula and the national stay away hosted by the Economic Freedom Front on 20 March 2023 illustrated the politicisation of job (in)security and its effects on South Africans. The NLMP is “an attempt by the government to create direction on how to manage the complexities of our economy,” stated Natalie Singer, Executive Consultant and Human Capital Specialist at Global Business Solutions .

Skilled labour shortages in the South African economy have ensured the war on talent continues, but what does that mean for employers and how do they remain compliant with incoming legislation? The NLMP serves as a regulatory measure which extends South Africa’s obligation to uphold standards as a member of the International Labour Organisation(ILO).

As the NLMP is introduced, it affects other facets of national legislation such as the Employment Services Act (of 2014) which must be amended to take it into account. The amendment to the bill is over one year behind schedule, however with the looming election period, it is presumed that it will be prioritised as it serves as a point of political contention.

The priorities of the NLMP are as follows:

  1. Attracting and retaining skills (in)to the country to meet the economy’s long and short-term goals
  2. Imposing quotas to limit the number of foreigners
  3. Prioritising certain sectors in urgent need of critical skills
  4. Improving conditions for all migrant workers
  5. Improving the conditions of social protection of migrant workers in South Africa and upon return to their country of origin
  6. Creating legal labour migration pathways through strong bi- and multilateral partnerships with SADC Member States and beyond

2022 transformation numbers reported that 3-3.5% of the South African labour force consists of foreign nationals. This is with the exception of skilled labour or Artisans who were represented by a percentage of 1.7% foreign nationals.

The Zimbabwean Exemption Permit’s (ZEP) imminent expiration date is something which employers across South African industries must pay close attention to. Meant to expire in April of 2021 the ZEP was extended to 30 June 2023. This grace period is mandated by the Department of Home Affairs as a concession for Zimbabwean foreign nationals to re-apply for their relevant South African visas or return to Zimbabwe.

Although it is illegal for foreign nationals to hold occupations without the relevant legal requirements being met, liability falls on employers to enforce the law within correct due diligence processes.

Employers have very specific obligations, as per the Immigration Act and associated regulations, including and ensuring that:

  • Foreign national employees hold a valid passport/ID and visa
  • Employment is consistent with the conditions of the employee’s visa
  • Home Affairs is notified when a foreign national leaves their employment
  • All documentation is retained for at least two (2) years (I think this is 3 years and Natalie stated that its even safer to retain it for 5 years – can someone confirm please?)after the foreign national has exited

It is also mandated by the government that employers prioritise hiring South Africans before foreign nationals. The Critical Skills List serves as an indication of skills which are lacking nationally where the government recognises the need to hire foreign nationals, more than in other circumstances.

Some of these roles which speak to TESD members in the technical and engineering sectors are the following:

  • Architect
  • Civil Engineer
  • Geologist
  • Industrial Engineer
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Metallurgist
  • Quantity Surveyor

The Critical Skills List has other concessions which form part and parcel of the list such as tertiary qualifications being in line with the South African Qualifications Authority.

All South African employers are encouraged to audit their employees regularly to remain compliant with South African Labour Law. The fast-approaching expiry of the ZEP will have legal consequences for employers. Businesses must also take note of the Lesotho Exemption Permit expiry in June 2024.

END.

Media Contact Details:

Client Rep.: Christa Smith I christa@associationadministrator.co.za

Agency Rep.: Brad Watridge  I brad@hotmustard.co.za I Mobile: 074 793 9338

About The TESD

The TESD provides temporary employment service providers with a stakeholder forum to regulate this specialised industry to serve the needs of their clients and to protect the rights of their candidates in a legally compliant environment.

Since 1994, the TESD has and continues to ensure the credibility and compliance of its members who provide their services to a variety of employees and employers centred in the construction industry. The TESD also supports members operating in secondary industries namely agriculture, raw materials, manufacturing, construction, and the service industry. The TESD recognized the need for a platform where temporary employment service providers are given a voice and become part of a credible representative body in the eyes of stakeholders such as employees, clients, contractors, bargaining councils and trade unions.

The TESD strives to improve the image of labour brokering and uphold the labour ethics and laws, thereby increasing member credibility and compliance.

TESD urges members to observe incoming NLMP legislation

“In my mind we are facing three main disruptors in the labour market that are going to result in the displacement of I think between one and 1.5 million people in the next few months and years.”

These were the words of Joint Chief Executive Officer of Global Business Solutions John Botha at the Temporary Employment Services Division webinar discussing the National Labour Migration Policy.

Botha identified the major disruptors with a particular focus on the intricacies surrounding the pertinent National Labour Migration Policy(NLMP).

The disruptors outlined by Botha were the following:

  1. The National Labour Migration Policy
  2. Employment Equity ministerial targets and
  3. Platform workers

The above mentioned were categorised as a “wonderful opportunity” for employers to build their business in alignment with South African labour law.

In the South African political landscape, foreign nationals are an easy target. Operation Dudula and the national stay away hosted by the Economic Freedom Front on 20 March 2023 illustrated the politicisation of job (in)security and its effects on South Africans. The NLMP is “an attempt by the government to create direction on how to manage the complexities of our economy,” stated Natalie Singer, Executive Consultant and Human Capital Specialist at Global Business Solutions .

Skilled labour shortages in the South African economy have ensured the war on talent continues, but what does that mean for employers and how do they remain compliant with incoming legislation? The NLMP serves as a regulatory measure which extends South Africa’s obligation to uphold standards as a member of the International Labour Organisation(ILO).

As the NLMP is introduced, it affects other facets of national legislation such as the Employment Services Act (of 2014) which must be amended to take it into account. The amendment to the bill is over one year behind schedule, however with the looming election period, it is presumed that it will be prioritised as it serves as a point of political contention.

The priorities of the NLMP are as follows:

  1. Attracting and retaining skills (in)to the country to meet the economy’s long and short-term goals
  2. Imposing quotas to limit the number of foreigners
  3. Prioritising certain sectors in urgent need of critical skills
  4. Improving conditions for all migrant workers
  5. Improving the conditions of social protection of migrant workers in South Africa and upon return to their country of origin
  6. Creating legal labour migration pathways through strong bi- and multilateral partnerships with SADC Member States and beyond

2022 transformation numbers reported that 3-3.5% of the South African labour force consists of foreign nationals. This is with the exception of skilled labour or Artisans who were represented by a percentage of 1.7% foreign nationals.

The Zimbabwean Exemption Permit’s (ZEP) imminent expiration date is something which employers across South African industries must pay close attention to. Meant to expire in April of 2021 the ZEP was extended to 30 June 2023. This grace period is mandated by the Department of Home Affairs as a concession for Zimbabwean foreign nationals to re-apply for their relevant South African visas or return to Zimbabwe.

Although it is illegal for foreign nationals to hold occupations without the relevant legal requirements being met, liability falls on employers to enforce the law within correct due diligence processes.

Employers have very specific obligations, as per the Immigration Act and associated regulations, including and ensuring that:

  • Foreign national employees hold a valid passport/ID and visa
  • Employment is consistent with the conditions of the employee’s visa
  • Home Affairs is notified when a foreign national leaves their employment
  • All documentation is retained for at least two (3) years after the foreign national has exited

It is also mandated by the government that employers prioritise hiring South Africans before foreign nationals. The Critical Skills List serves as an indication of skills which are lacking nationally where the government recognises the need to hire foreign nationals, more than in other circumstances.

Some of these roles which speak to TESD members in the technical and engineering sectors are the following:

  • Architect
  • Civil Engineer
  • Geologist
  • Industrial Engineer
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Metallurgist
  • Quantity Surveyor

The Critical Skills List has other concessions which form part and parcel of the list such as tertiary qualifications being in line with the South African Qualifications Authority.

All South African employers are encouraged to audit their employees regularly to remain compliant with South African Labour Law. The fast-approaching expiry of the ZEP will have legal consequences for employers. Businesses must also take note of the Lesotho Exemption Permit expiry in June 2024.

Why should a TES join the CEA (TESD)?

The Metal Industry Main Agreement (MA) was gazetted by the Minister of Employment and Labour on 7 October and became legally binding on all employers, including Temporary Employment Service (TES) providers, in the metals and engineering (M&E) sector on 17 October 2022.

A key and unique feature of the MA is that it does not differentiate between an employer owning and/or overseeing a factory and a TES provider providing labour and related services to employers in the sector. The MA treats both the same and apart from the provisions related to joint and several liability contained in the Labour Relations Act (LRA), TES providers in a post gazettal operating environment are legally obliged to adhere to all the terms and conditions of engagement, employment and deployment contained in the MA.

Over and above what the LRA prescribes for TES providers, the MA sets out a comprehensive set of terms and conditions related to how TES providers should operate in the M&E sector. In a post gazettal environment, should must be read as shall and whilst some TES providers may be tempted to cut corners and claim ignorance when it comes to various legal compliance obligations contained in the MA, the Bargaining Council i.e., the industry’s compliance and enforcement agency, will not be swayed by arguments of ‘’I did not know” or “I wasn’t aware”.

Clients of TES providers who knowingly or unknowingly enter into commercial agreements containing provisions in conflict with the MA will be found wanting. The Bargaining Council will have no hesitation in following up on such complaints, will site the TES provider and the client in any ensuing dispute and should the client and/or the TES provider be found wanting, joint and several liability will come into play. 

In a business environment where legal compliance is becoming increasingly complicated, it’s imperative when considering making use of a TES provider, you do so knowing you are contracting with an agency that is reputable, compliant and most importantly has been vetted by a body that was instrumental in getting TES providers recognized as being no different to any other employer operating in the M&E sector – the CEA (TESD).

The Temporary Employment Services Division of the CEA is the only reputable voluntary professional body of TES providers in the M&E sector. The body speaks for and on behalf of TES providers and ensures that TES providers are treated no different to any other employer in the sector, are recognized for the important service they provide and are acknowledged for the many thousands of pathways they have created for employees who have been provided to clients and over time find permanent employment.

The CEA (TESD), as a condition of accredited membership, will require that a TES provider seeking affiliation subject itself to an accreditation audit, conducted by an independent auditor, appointed by the CEA (TESD) to verify and validate legal compliance with provisions contained in the MA, LRA, MEIBC, MIBFA etc. Having passed the audit, the TES provider will be issued with a certificate of compliance and will be loaded to the industry data base of compliant TES providers. This process enjoys the full support of the Bargaining Council, the Department of Employment and Labour, industry trade unions and for employers or clients amounts to a resounding vote of confidence and peace of mind.  

Should you be interested in joining a body of reputable and professional TES providers and in the process network and be part of the on-going discussions related to the future of TES providers in the metals and engineering industry, no more than ever would be a good time to do so.

To join the CEA (TESD) or to get more information on the benefits of being a member email Christa Smith at christa@associationadministrator.co.za or visit the TESD website at www.tesd.org.za.

How Do We Navigate the Rising Gig Economy as Temporary Employment Services in SA?

The Temporary Employment Services (TES) industry is adapting to a changing labour market. The Fourth Industrial Revolution has ushered in exciting developments such as the everyday use of artificial intelligence, wireless digital technologies, robotics, a constantly expanding internet as well as a fusing of digital and physical worlds. Undoubtedly, these have played a major role in giving rise to new business models which are currently affecting the nature of work and employment relationships worldwide. While the successful adoption of these technologies is promising for businesses and consumers, it has also presented new challenges to the labour market. It has brought with it economic disruption with uncertain socio-economic consequences for Africa.

Unblurring the lines

The gig economy is a labour market made up of freelance work, as opposed to permanent, in-house jobs. As work tends to be temporary or project-based; gig workers are independently hired to complete a specific project for a specific period. While seeming like TES work, gig work is not to be confused with TES. There are online platforms where gig workers privately offer their services and get into contracts with businesses. TES or labour broking involves companies or the end users employing a temporary workforce through TES companies, which are agencies that provide these workers for a short period of time. Both these types of arrangements are often called alternative or non-standard work arrangements as opposed to traditional, permanent employment.

More and more South African workers are opting for the “non-standard” approach to making ends meet. Many of these are looking towards TES providers to protect their interests and rights in business relationships. Albie Rheeder, from the Temporary Employment Services Division (TESD), remarks that the recently proposed amendments to Draft National Labour Migration Policy and the Employment Services Amendment Bill raises pertinent questions for the digital labour market utilising these gig workers.

Adapting to an evolving labour market

“The inclusion of digital platforms in the act means that businesses like e-hailing services, will need to adapt their models to comply with the changes.” Rheeder goes on to pose the question whether a young entrepreneur that has conceptualised an application which provides a service for South African companies and creates the required employment opportunities be required to report the freelance foreign gig worker in the Baltic states and India that do the development? Do these need to be recorded as employees or workers? “Only time will tell if these international corporations shy away from bringing new technologies and if the act wants to create opportunities for South African citizens,” adds Rheeder. The TES industry helps to boost the economy by creating employment and supporting end users by efficiently providing a supply of short-term labour. The industry will need to evolve with the modern times and updated regulations to continue benefiting the South African economy.

In the interim, the Temporary Employment Services Division (TESD) is providing TES companies with a stakeholder forum to potentially help regulate this specialised industry, helping their members to serve the needs of the client and to protect the rights of the TES candidate, like the gig worker, in a legally compliant environment. The division continues to increase awareness for and supports industry compliancy. It is essential that TES providers comply with all current requirements. In terms of the proposed draft and amendment, good practice requires that there is no missing documentation for foreign workers and that the job application is relevant to the skills on an issued permits for temporary workers who are foreigners in South Africa.

Equipping HVAC+R Inspectors

Compliance is an ongoing necessity as it plays a large role in safety. The gas industry is no exception to this principle. Many air conditioning and refrigeration related breakdowns are a result of non-compliance to the Pressure Equipment Regulations (PER) sound engineering practice and standards. The proper regulation of AC&R installations and maintenance is essential as these installations involve various gases that need to be handled as stipulated by the PER. The Department of Employment and Labour (DEL) has appointed 500 new recruited inspectors across all 9 provinces to assist in keeping the gas industry safe, including installations that require refrigeration gases. The increased number of inspectors will ensure AC&R installations completed in South Africa have been inspected timeously and thoroughly.

The South African Qualifications and Certifications Committee of Gas (SAQCC Gas) is mandated by the DEL to ensure the gas industry operates as specified by the PER. SAQCC Gas is made up of 4 member associations, regulating the AC&R industry within SAQCC Gas is the South African Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Contractors Association (SARACCA). SARACCA’s primary objective is to ensure both the end-user and the Authorised Refrigeration Gas Practitioner are safe, this involves ensuring all installations have been completed in compliance with the PER and the relevant AC+R standards.

To equip the new inspectors, SAQCC Gas in conjunction with the DEL conducted a training session on the 2nd -5th November 2020 with over 100 of the new inspectors. SARACCA conducted a section specific to the AC&R industry, to help the inspectors to understand and know what to look for when conducting an AC 0r R inspection, this session included theoretical and technical knowledge. 

Key pointers:

  • Refrigerants commonly used
  • The phasing out of HCFCs and HFCs
  • The aspects of safety in refrigeration equipment

The HVAC+R industry is growing rapidly. We are happy that growth comes with an increase in inspections, a safe industry is a prolific industry. – SARACCA

The objective of the training was to fully equip the inspectors to conduct thorough inspections and keep the gas industry safe and compliant.

As an industry, we are excited about the increase in the number of inspectors. This will make a huge difference in the gas industry in terms of policing and enforcement. – SAQCC Gas

Are you sure you are Insured?

Years of faithful insurance premiums can prove valueless in the absence of a Certificate of Conformity (CoC). It is a startling fact that you stand to lose hefty amounts of money that were meant to be an “insurance” on your assets. Insurance companies will not cough-up if you cannot present a valid CoC when making a claim. Can you afford to lose all your assets and have your insurance repudiated?

A vast majority of South African citizens are moving towards the use of Gas Appliances due to the increasing cost of electricity and possible outages. However, most users are unaware of the specific regulations and safety standards with which they must comply when getting gas equipment installed in their households. Overlooking these regulations can be detrimental in many ways.

According to the Pressure Equipment Regulations (PER), all Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas appliances and equipment should meet the specified standards to ensure safety. These regulations set out the requirements regarding the design, manufacture, operation, repair, modification, maintenance, inspection and testing of pressure equipment.  In terms of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, 1993, the PER also requires persons handling the installation of any gas systems to undergo specific training and to be registered with the South African Qualification and Certification Committee – Gas (SAQCC Gas). The Registered Gas Practitioner must issue a Certificate of Conformity (CoC) for any equipment they install.

What is a CERTIFICATE OF CONFORMITY?

A Certificate of Conformity (CoC) for Gas installations is a legal document which must be obtained whenever a gas system is installed, modified or repaired and should be retained for possible future requirement.

Only Registered Practitioners may issue a CoC and a complete list of these practitioners can be found on: www.saqccgas.co.za

COC and Insurance

Most People are oblivious to the importance of holding a CoC for every Gas installation on their properties, this includes air conditioning and refrigeration units – the importance is generally realised when it is too late. It is usual for people to get insurance cover for their properties and assets, however, it is a staggering truth that owners could be paying insurance premiums for years and end up receiving no cover in the occurrence of an incident or accident involving gas. Should there be no valid Certificate of Conformity, many insurance companies will not accept liability for costs of damage caused to property or assets. The loss and damage suffered by an owner/user due to a Gas installation for which a valid CoC has not been issued, falls entirely on the owner. Regardless of cost of reparation, the insurance will most likely not cover it.

The majority of insurance companies would require this certificate to prove that the installation was safe and had been serviced regularly.” Lanice Steward- managing director of Knight Frank Anne Porter

The Reliability of LNG Supply in South Africa

There are two key considerations when moving away from coal-powered energy. Firstly, what is the safety track record of the alternatives, and secondly can these alternatives reduce supply risk?

Switching from coal is not just about the environment. Commercial and mining interests cannot afford to move to an alternative energy source that in the long run cannot guarantee continuous supply or compromised delivery through domestic unrest.

Alternatives – Is the Grass Greener?

Ideally, alternatives should tick all the boxes, and this has contributed to a slow uptake in moving away from coal-powered energy and essentially moving off-grid. There is a lot at stake, very little localised data, coupled with the variety on offer industrial and mining clients have long considered the switch with little or no commitment.

To drive the move away from coal-powered energy, companies like LNG Hub have introduced a consultancy service, offering potential industrial and mining companies the opportunity to carefully plan the switch to an environmentally suitable energy mix. LNG Hub provides Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) to a variety of industries using 3 key onsite solutions coupled with consistent supply (sourced locally) essentially ticking all the boxes with minimised risk. 

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Preparing Campuses for a Fresh Start: Impact Cleaning Integrated Services Unveils Year-End Cleaning Checklist for Universities

As the academic year draws to a close, Impact Cleaning introduces an all-encompassing year-end cleaning checklist tailored specifically for universities and colleges across South Africa. This comprehensive guide aims to assist educational institutions in ensuring their campuses are pristine and organised before the year-end break.

The Importance of Deep Cleaning and Organisation

Amidst the bustling academic semesters, the year-end break offers a prime opportunity for universities to undergo thorough cleaning and organisation processes. Impact Cleaning emphasises the pivotal role of deep cleaning in not only maintaining hygiene standards but also in revitalising campus spaces. A meticulously cleaned environment not only fosters a healthier atmosphere but also contributes to the longevity of campus facilities.

Benefits for Educational Institutions

This tailored checklist serves as a strategic tool for educational institutions to streamline their year-end preparations. By adhering to the guidelines outlined by Impact Cleaning, universities can:

  • Enhance Hygiene Standards: Eliminate germs and ensure a clean environment conducive to learning.
  • Preserve Infrastructure: Protect and maintain the integrity of campus buildings and facilities.
  • Create Positive Impressions: Leave a lasting positive impression on students, staff, and visitors alike.
  • Prepare for a Fresh Start: Begin the new academic year with organised and refreshed facilities.

Tailored Solutions for Universities

Impact Cleaning understands the diverse needs of educational institutions. With a keen focus on delivering customised solutions, their Year-End Cleaning Checklist covers a spectrum of areas including:

  • Residential Halls: Deep cleaning of dormitories to ensure students return to a refreshed living space.
  • Academic Buildings: Thorough cleaning of classrooms, lecture halls, and laboratories.
  • Common Areas: Sanitization and organisation of libraries, cafeterias, and recreational spaces.
  • Grounds and Landscaping: Outdoor area maintenance for an inviting campus environment.

As the academic year draws to a close, Impact Cleaning stands ready to support universities in South Africa with their comprehensive Year-End Cleaning Checklist.

For further details, visit our website.

Elevating Education Ecosystems: Leading the Way in Nurturing Impactful Sustainability on Campuses

In a rapidly evolving educational landscape, Impact Cleaning Integrated Services has emerged as a pioneering force, setting new standards in education support services. With over two decades of experience and a relentless commitment to excellence, we are not just service providers; we are trusted partners in the journey toward nurturing sustainable campuses.

A Unique Approach to Partnership

We understand that modern campuses are more than just places of learning. They are dynamic hubs of innovation, growth, and community development. Our philosophy is simple yet powerful: we seek enduring relationships, not fleeting contracts. We stand by our clients, offering unwavering support and guidance in making policy decisions that positively impact student growth and campus well-being.

What truly sets us apart is our holistic integration of services. We go beyond industry standards, seamlessly blending our offerings to address diverse needs. Our comprehensive approach ensures a cohesive and efficient education ecosystem that fosters long-term sustainability.

We stand by our clients, offering unwavering support and guidance in making policy decisions that positively impact student growth and campus well-being.

Driving Innovation Through Technology

We recognise the transformative potential of smart technology and artificial intelligence (AI). As part of our commitment to innovation, we have invested significantly in these areas. By harnessing AI tools, we empower educational institutions to adapt and thrive in the digital age. This forward-thinking approach ensures that our clients are not just prepared for the future but leading the way in educational excellence.

Embracing Disruption for Progress

Disruptors by nature, we thrive on continuous improvement and a game-changing mindset. Our dedication to innovation isn’t just a buzzword; it’s a driving force that propels educational institutions toward excellence and sustainability.

For further information on Impact Cleaning Integrated Services click here.

End of the Road for Paper CoC’s Announced

As of the 1st of April 2023, any Certificate of Conformity (CoC) issued by paper will not be considered valid.

SAQCC Gas is proud to announce the complete digital shift to the issuing of certification by gas practitioners in South Africa. The move comes in the wake of an increase in certification-related incidents of fraud. This is a proactive initiative put in place by the SAQCC Gas, to ensure accountability and safety within the gas industry, only a registered gas practitioner can issue a CoC.

The digital CoC was launched in 2021 and is in line with South African standards, ensuring the gas industry remains one of the safest in the world. SAQCC Gas would like to encourage the end-user to not accept paper CoCs after the 1st of April 2023 and confirm the validity of a gas practitioner’s registration by visiting www.saqccgas.co.za.

Practitioner’s registration cards can also be viewed onsite via the SAQCC Gas App. We call on the gas industry and consumers to report any illegal installations by emailing info@saqccgas.co.za.
At SAQCC Gas we encourage all gas practitioners to download the SAQCC Gas App and register. The process of issuing a digital CoC is quick, simple, and convenient whether you are on or offline. The application has specifically been designed to suit the requirements of our industry and technical support is on hand to assist with any enquiries.
We would like to thank the gas practitioners who have made the transition to issuing digital CoCs effortlessly and look forward to assisting others to do the same.


Yours in Safety,